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now!" >> the enormous latino presence in the united states, unless you understand america's role in latin america, and in fact the latino presence in the country is the harvest of the empire. >> "harvest of empire: the untold story of latinos in america." a new documentary opens this week based on "democracy now!" juan gonzalez's book, examining how u.s. intervention in latin america forced millions of people to move to the united states. we will speak with juan, as well as co-director eduardo lopez and air excerpts of the found. >> the american nation cannot, must not, and will not permit the establishment of another communist government in the western hemisphere. >> i am here because the united states invaded my country in 1965, and illegal invasion, completely trumped up excuse to invade the dominican republic and crush our democratic hopes. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. at least five people had been killed in u.s. drone strike inside pakistan. a pair of missiles reportedly struck a vil
, 2003, the united states was pushing very hard to get iran referred to the u.s. security council for not being forthcoming. remember that there was the war in iraq. there was a strong push on the part of the europeans, especially britain, germany, and france not to go to the security council because they saw iran going the way of iraq. going to the security council would be a mandate for war. countries like france had been at odds with the united states over iraq and did not want to be at odds with the u.s. over iran, but wanted to stop the united states from doing what it did to iraq. we had a dramatic event where the foreign ministers of germany, in october, 2003, struck an agreement where iran would embark on uranium enrichment. it is the ultimate in dual use technology. it had the united states stepping back and britain, germany, and france became known as the eu3. in november of 2004, iran went along with this saying they would also be a part of uranium enrichment. but he doesn't buy, eu3 was submitting a proposal to iran promising help for its program. this is where you get
at the importance of kazakhstan in the region, and it's a relationship which the united states. "this is america" visits of the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. later, i will talk with kazakhstan's foreign minister. right now, a visit with the u.s. ambassador to kazakhstan, kenneth fairfax. >> what should americans know about kazakhstan? >> i think the short answer is a lot more than they currently do. >> thank you. >> it is the ninth largest country on earth. it is a country that has a rather extraordinary relations with the united states, and yet most people really know either nothing or worse than nothing -- what they have seen in a movie, which is the opposite of reality, of course. there is a lot to learn. >> what are the mutual interests of the two countries, the united states and kazakhstan? >> we have many. you can look at it as an
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
an anti-islamic film made in the united states. some have ignored the message. there's been clashes after friday prayers in some cities. [applause] >> the government had called the peaceful protest, but here in northwest pakistan, they soon turned violent. these demonstrators attacking a sin mark in a city, setting it on fire. they've already been casualties in clashes where the police with one support reported to have been killed. it was the prime minister and his government who had made friday what they called a special day of love for the prophet muhammad. a chance for the entire nation to protest at what they see as the blasphemous video made in the united states. >> an attack of the holy prophet is an attack on the -- therefore, this is something that is unacceptable. >> there had already been clashes in the capital on thursday outside the united states embassy. fearing even worse today, the american government took the unusual step of placing this advertisement on pakistan television, hoping it would diffuse tensions. >> since our founding, the united states has been a nation that r
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
are not going to t along with anyone, so why try to pacify them? england, the united states, get out of the united nations. i'm tired of hearing hate speeches from people from other countries condemning us. this is a united nations of hate. host: if you go to the united nations web site, it says -- what you think? caller: i think at the time it was probably a good thing, but i don't think they counted on the rise of communism from china and russia and on the muslims and i think the muslims are a big problem with the united nations right now and we should stop trying to pacify them. we have a wenow who seems to sit there and watched-- we have a president now who seems to sit there and watch it. all he has been doing is apologizing. they killed two of our soldiers in afghanistan and the apologized to them. when the embassy was attacked, it was the man who had the movie's iffault. these people hate us. host: here is this on twitter -- here's the washington post front page -- many remember last year when the palestinian leader's request for membership was denied, not something supported
the united states six years atoka in my first i told the mexican people that it was possible to transform mexico. i say that we could turn it into a postal nation with a competitive economy and we could build a first site to with more opportunities for everyone. we have mexico in a safer nation with a strong will of dhaka. i can tell you today we have made great strides and help put mexico on the track to make these decisions a reality. i would like to share some reflections on health care we have a stronger nation. let me start by talking of the transformation of the mexican economy. as you know, we have to confront the global kinnock crisis in memory. mexico was particularly vulnerable because our ties to the american economy which was at the epicenter of the crisis years ago half to and we took the necessary measures to prevent this crisis from becoming a major catastrophe. in doing so we were guided with three basic. financial discipline, economic freedom and increased competitiveness in we stayed after the country. first mexico has strong economic fundamentals. many countries put in
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
for the country. against perceived internal and external dangerous forces. israel, united states, first at the regime. vicious than enough of that over the decades and afterward he went from credence to that notion, that paranoia. so the syrian population made this bargain with the regime that they would give freedoms in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the re
that it is going as you will understand the united states we understand of madison and jefferson and washington how they form the country but would be a very good basis for understanding what was going on in the united states so current china was very much shaped by deng xiaoping. he came to power in 1978 and was the dominant person right up until 1992 for the period of about 14 years. what i thought i would do in the brief time today i was told to not talk for more than 20 minutes would be to talk about some of the forces that shaped what he was and what he did to transform china because 1978 the country that he inherited had a per capita income of less than $100 per capita. now is estimated somewhere rs/6000 and it's on the path of that he is headed on. there is almost no migration from the countryside in the city and since he came perhaps 200 million have moved from the countryside to the town and the city. when he came to power the country was still involved in the cultural revolution and the relevant nettie toward each other and he worked to unite the country to set it on the new path. what ar
-year plan. how many of you have studied the plan? you know, in the united states and u.s. context, the entire idea of five-year plans sounds preposterous. they are taken serious in china and this one in particular is like a chain in the curve for the chinese economy. it says basically looking backwards china's successes have almost been enough low-wage factoriescome the building, road roads and all the rasputin the future under this plan they want to have more high-tech. they want infotech industry from a biotech industry coming clean take energy and aerospace industry. so the idea of the country can move from its current level of technology is something played out in this industry and a lot of others. another major theme you see about china in this field and others is the style of what i think of as the real estate centric theory of modernization. if you look for an explanation of almost anything happening in china now and say well why is the seaport go in there? why is this ancient village removed? why is x, y or z happening? real estate deals may not be the only answer, but usu
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
was essential to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was early 43 and the correspondent wrote a very good contemporary book that title referred to the fact at the heart of the canal can pay and which was the closely fought campaign in the pacific war enterprise was in our carriers combat in the pacific in 1922 the only other survivor was the uss saratoga which sustained on two occasions and therefore miss to the entirety for that year of years later couple reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that go through the enterprise during the entire war but he's told in a couple of e-mails he wished that they had been able to write a longer book and a road to the cut took him five years to write this one that would include more of the ship's company with with the navy called white hats, the steelers between them and the commission officers and the sheep petty officers who need the ship work and consequently, i wanted to devote a good
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
and egypt follow tuesday night's storming of the united states consulate in the libyan city of benghazi. the u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other staff members were killed in the attack. stevens is the first u.s. ambassador to be killed on duty since 1979. on wednesday, president obama vowed to bring to justice those responsible for the deaths in libya. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. we are working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats and have directed my administration to increase security at posts around the world. make no mistake, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attack our people. >> the obama administration has dispatched an elite group of marines to the libyan capital of tripoli. in addition, two u.s. warships are reportedly headed towards the libyan coast and the u.s. has redeployed surveillance drones over libya. protests against them have also occurred in iraq, iran, tunisia, and bangladesh. >> at the center of the controversy is an online trailer
vowed to bring justice to the killers in this libyan attack. to the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. make no mistake. we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who have attacked our people. since our founding, the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject denigrating the religious police of others. there is absolutely no type of excuse for this type of senseless violence. megyn: joining me now we have two guests. bill, thank you for being here. i want to talk to you as a former communications person. about the response we have seen this morning from the president and from governor romney. >> it is a very difficult time. i thought the president's remarks looked a little devoid of passion. governor romney is getting a lot of criticism for his position with the president, but i think he is right to make a point. the world is a very dangerous place. when people think they can attack america with tyranny. megyn: why would our state department and embassy be coming out with p
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
and a stern warning. the israeli prime min sister warning the united states to establish a clear line that iran cannot cross with the nuclear program. this morning we ask what is that line and what happens if it's crossed? >>> front page scandal. the royal family trying to stop topless pictures of kate from spreading. an italian magazine owned by the former prime minister silvio berlusconi is publishing a 38-page special edition. it's hitting newsstands now. >> a replacement ref replaced before the kickoff. side judge brian stropolo booted for openly being a saints fan. he posted pictures of himself in saints gearal gating. monday morning quarterback this one. one. "newsroom" begins right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin this hour with muslim outrage and new flare-ups of anti-american violence. one flash point, kabul, afghanistan. crowds of protesters turn on police when they try to block their march toward the u.s. embassy. at least 15 officers are hurt and their vehicles set on fire. in ind
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
on for the past year and the worsening of relations between united states and pakistan. >> ok, when you're at the state department, you revise the u.s. government on relations between pakistan and afghanistan. mousavi video president obama put out, this thing -- you saw the video president obama put up, distancing america from the film. does that help? >> it does help. it is the first time united states is taking this kind of innovative pro-active measure. in some ways, you are trying to use this when already a tidal wave has started. it is hard to stop a tidal wave. >> is there anything washington can do? >> keep engaging on an ongoing basis. not this one a crisis happens. also, when we have disagreements with pakastani, we should explain ourselves to them. we should have kept them engaged. where we see the consequences of the collapse of the relationship as we saw today, then we try to come up with these measures, and often they are good, but they are too little to late. >> is that the problem? we have a short-term policy? >> we decided we should punish them, put pressure on pakistan.
the united states, in fact, for something like this. i think thers going to be a lot of, you know, the u.s. is really going to hunker down and think about how they want to proceed now. not just in libya but in the whole region. >> elise, this is brooke. let me just, as john points out, you know, diplomats really are certainly mourning this morning and we're covering the ory, really there's no way any other network can. if we can just back up and if you can help us fill in the blanks as far as what exactly happened. here we are day two now of protests. we've been covering the protests in cairo and in benghazi. we remember covering the revolution, it was really the rebel stronghold last year. explain what exactly happened as far as this ambassador is concerned and the three other workers who were apparently with him in his car? >> details are very sketchy right now. what we understand is we knew yesterday, towards the end of the day, that as we were watching those pictures at the embassy in cairo, there were gunmen that had approached the u.s. consulate in benghazi, and breached the walls
is a big thing that iran knows and israel knows and the rest of the world knows that the united states is not going to let iran get a weapon or capability of getting a weapon. >> first of all, i think there's a balance. you need to strike a balance. what many including governor romney and congressman ryan and others around the world have said you have to be specific about this capability point. that you have to be able to signal to the iranians and the world that just building the weapon or getting close to building the weapon, is not the red line. having the tools at their disposal, that they would be easily assembled is a big problem and must be stopped because if they have the tools to assemble a weapon, easily assemble a weapon, it will have the impact that the iranian leadership wants. it will enable them to establish some set of region in the back their terror proxy operations through hezbollah and hamasimpum to just put pressure on friends and adversaries of ours and that's unacceptable and drawing that line does not mean you have to say at this specific moment at this specific
drones. it is coming from two respected universities in the united states. i think if this message is coming from independent academics and the united states, maybe it will be listened to. the report conclude the strikes are damaging and counterproductive. they estimate the overall number of top leaders killed among the drone victims is perhaps only 2%. they say while they are not killing the top tier or not be enough of the commanders, they are terrorizing an entire community. that is the word that they use, stressing that the drones hovering overhead night and day. they say communities are paralyzed by fear and many people are too frightened to go to import and gatherings. parent are keeping their children out of schools or the children themselves are too traumatized to go. the level of fear has been compared to the level of fear in the u.s. after 9/11. >> the report also says the vast majority of those victims are combatants or low-level combatants. americas argument is if it did not use drones, it would have to use much more interest of tactics to go after these combatants. >>
not cleared by washington" and does not reflect the views of the united states government. 10:25 p.m. the romney campaign lifts the embargo. sometime after midnight, the original cairo embassy statement and subsequent tweets are removed from the website and the twitter account. 12:09 a.m., obama campaign spokesman e-mails reporters saying the campaign is shocked that governor romney would choose to launch political attack at this time. 5:30 a.m. wednesday the 12. confirmation that the u.s. ambassador to libya, christophersteins and three other staff -- christopher stevens and three other staff members were killed in the benghazi attack. 9:27 a.m. secretary clinton speaks at the state department. >> this was an attack by a small and savage group. >> 10:16 a.m., governor romney addresses the attacks and his chricriticism. >> in the face of the violence, america cannot shrink from the responseability to lead. >> 10:42, president obama talks about the benghazi attack from the rose garden. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. >> 12:30
in egypt, say is turkey the model, i say there is no good model. even the united states of america is not a model if you are serious about freedom, dignity and also the power of the state. because i'm ready to talk about -- i will come to that point about separating, you know, the state from religion. but if you separate or distinguish the state from religion, tell me what you put instead of religion. because what we are facing in the west now -- and we all know this as citizens -- i live in europe, you live in the united states of america, and we all know that the problem that we have with our democracies now is not the dramatic decision of religions, but some magic decisions of transnational corporation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to think anything. and we call it democracy, we're still today dealing with powers that are beyond the democratic procedures. the banks, transnational corporations. and we are facing with people who are deciding. for example, in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats who are coming to solve the problem. we never el
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
is from the united states when they have killed the highest official, the person who represents our country, in that country? >> well, without some intelligence, the united states has no idea who it is. i am told that the libyan government, such as it is, has promised the white house that it will assist in gathering the intelligence necessary to identify these people. but whether they will, or they won't, whether they can or they can't is something else again. remember that the government of libya has a domestic support among other people, radical islamists and other crazies and it's going to be extremely difficult for them to cooperate too much with the united states because they're on shaky ground. >> are we leaving everything up to the libyan government to search? i mean, you would think -- >> no. i mean we have the capability of using overhead assets, satellites -- >> drones? >> and some intelligence on the ground, too. but we are not very well situated in libya to try and get human intelligence, and at the end of the day, it's human intelligence that really drives the effort to
be described as young a. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day fo. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights. kerrey has done such a good job. there is very little to add. then i will talk about the business cases. the two. i would make about the act is first to think about why it is the justices would get involved. these cases are not in the docket. in the illustration in to help the court work. the justices have a rule that says if we're point to strike down a federal statute, that is our job. they're likely to step in. the voting rights act case, several of them come on a peel. you have to ask the supreme court to grant review. there are slivers of cases in the united states coal that there is a right to go to the supreme court. they have different ways of dodging them. we almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. the second point out and make is what to expect from the pivotal justices. this is at the cente
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
with protecting the united states in particular. the obama administration changed our plans for european missile defense to leverage the existing missile defense system and put that system sure first in romania and poland later on. they also curtailed the ground-based midcourse. they stopped it at 30. i think the wrong administration would actually probably go back and change the balance again, much more in favor of national missile defense systems and we have actually seen in congress, republicans have been pushing the idea of deploying some of these ground-based and interceptors on the united states disclosed. another area of specific differences in shipbuilding. it is an imperfect measure, but the total number of ships in the navy -- it actually reached a low point at 279 ships, i should say. that was in the bush administration in 2007. we have come up since then i think we were about 280 ships right now. the obama administration plans to bring the shift count up to about 300. the goal is still 313. but if you look over 830 year shipbuilding plan, and averages over 30 years. so if we graduall
's still time for diplomacy to work. netanyahu will head to the united states later this month but won't be meeting u.s. president barack obama. israeli media quoted a senior israeli official saying white house staff declined netanyahu's request for a meeting with obama. netanyahu wanted to discuss iran's nuclear program. he was expected to press obama to set deadlines. the first time netanyahu has visited the u.s. without meeting the president, since taking office three years ago. a white house spokesperson said scheduling issues ruled out a meeting. he also said the leaders are in frequent contact and netanyahu will meet secretary of state clinton and top officials instead. >>> judicial authorities in egypt have ordered the arrest of the last prime minister and the ousted president hosni mubarak. they accuse him of corruption. the state-run news agency reported the news. the case dates back to 1993. he's accused of selling government-owned land to mubarak's sons at a fraction of the price. he was working for an association affiliated with the air force. he denied the allegations and
against the united states, the ones citing that anti-islam film seemed to be waning, but there is a new target in france. a satire cal magazine, mocked the united states. and 22 schools are csed as a precaution against violence at france. >>> now we head to the golf where high stakes car games are under way. the u.s. placed an unmistakable signal to iran. abc's nick schriffen tells about about it. nic. >> reporter: diane, we're sailing on the nuclear powered uss eisenhower, and we're only about 50 miles from iran. never before has the u.s. flexed so much muscle so close to iran. more jets, ships and nations taking part than ever before. the u.s. has sent two aircraft carriers into this region and each one has more than 40 of these -- these are f-18 fighter jets that could reach thousands of miles into iranian air space. to give you a sense of how big this buildup is, each of these carriers has more firepower than the entire iranian air force. it's a blunt warning to iran, don't follow through on a threat to close the strait of hormuz, where one-fifth of all the world's oil passes. if is
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